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Jun 30, 2010

Don't despair

Sometimes its hard to follow your own advice. But in this case, it's important. Despite the signing of the ECFA today, there's no need to lsoe hope. There's lots of variables and lots of exciting times ahead.

No matter how fast the CCP intends to force Taiwan into political capitulation, and no matter how fast the KMT is willing to move toward a "path of no return" on unification, the opposition has time and has the ability to freeze or reverse the direction.

It might not be the brightest day, but the sun will again shine.

9 comments:

Random Taiwanese-American said...

Thanks for the encouragement. For the last couple of years I've approached every piece of news I've read regarding Taiwan with some trepidation, as if I'm bracing myself for bad news. But as bleak as things may seem sometimes, I always find it comforting to remember that at least we have our de facto independence. Comparatively speaking, it isn't so bad being a prosperous island that lives to fight another day.

Keep up the great work on this blog! It's one of my favorites (and I read a LOT of blogs).

dennis said...

yes i very much agree with your comment. certainly all is not lost, the people of taiwan (especially a specific portion of it needs to wake the f up) just need to voice, also more importantly turn it into action to protect their our home taiwan.

STOP Ma said...

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Sorry, A-gu. I don't share the same optimism. There was a glimmer of hope in 2005 which was lost when the PEOPLE voted in another KMT legislature.

Unfortunately, as in a lot of countries these days, short-term gratification trumps long-term wisdom. And the majority of youth seem to be preoccupied with themselves more than fighting for what is right -- this plays right into the hands of authoritarian-style governments.

I can't fall for blind optimism anymore.
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Islander said...

Well, said.

justrecently said...

There's no reason to lose hope - not in a country like Taiwan. China is a difficult neighbor, but in terms of stability, an open society does better than a totalitarian one.
If Taiwan continues its path towards openness and rule of law - and the achievements to date are remarkable -, there is little to fear (except for Beijing).

STOP Ma said...

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justrecently said,

...If Taiwan continues its path towards openness and rule of law - and the achievements to date are remarkable -, there is little to fear (except for Beijing).

Umm..."continues"?

Where have you been the past couple of years?

"Openness" and "rule of law" have been somewhat of a joke in Taiwan lately.
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justrecently said...

I agree that the rule of law has suffered under KMT rule. But Taiwan has a free press (despite efforts to stifle it), and alternatives to choose from for the electorate. Taiwan is an achiever. To criticize the government is one thing.
To talk Taiwan down is another. Mind the gap, stopma.

STOP Ma said...

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justrecently,

I'm not "talking down" on Taiwan. You mentioned that Taiwan is "continuing" down the path towards openness and rule of law. It is distinctly not. In fact, it is reversing direction in that regard -- significantly so.

The people DO still have the choice to stop traveling down this long-term ugly path. However, history has shown that the electorate (especially in local politics) is usually concerned about short-term goals.

I'm only keeping it real -- as they say.
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justrecently said...

If Taiwan continues its path towards openness and rule of law is what I wrote.

However, history has shown that the electorate (especially in local politics) is usually concerned about short-term goals.
You aren't obliged to respect your fellow country people. But you can't expect them to listen to you - a first step to get convinced - if you show them no respect. No genuine vote without the electorate.

I'm only keeping it real
That's what they always say. Could be a line from Ma Ying-jeou, just as well.